Military Outdoors

Military Outdoors

From our Blog

2 weeks 5 hours ago
Calling all volunteers for Sierra Club Military Outdoor's 3rd annual 911 Climb. This year's objective is the American Classic Mount Torment to Mount Forbidden Traverse in the North Cascades of Washington State. This climb is not for the faint of heart or the arm chair mountaineer....
2 weeks 6 hours ago
"The Cedar Mesa country in southeast Utah is a land of convoluted cliffs with arches, natural bridges, hoodoos, spires, hat rocks, ledges, and alcoves. It is a land of flash floods and extreme temperatures that demands much from those who would explore it. It is also an unparalleled museum of...
1 month 2 days ago
In Washington State, the population of the military community is approximately 40% of the state's total population. Additionally, the revenues generated around the military community, ranging from military installations and their surrounding communities to the aerospace industry are a...
1 month 6 days ago
For me, mountaineering has always replicated the good things that come from combat. Camaraderie, putting your life in the hands of your team in the pursuit of a dangerous objective, the inherent risk and thrill, operations and logistics, an adversary, and a sense of self worth and extraordinary...
2 months 2 days ago
Left to Right: Joshua Brandon, Stacy Bare, Tim Brown, Chad Spangler, Kathleen Koch The Russell Senate Building on Capitol Hill in DC feels about as far away from the wilderness as one could get. I made my way down endless marble halls, past imposing double-doored conference rooms and offices to...

Testimonials

For 7 days, the Boston Basin became my home. It welcomed me with frustration, exhaustion, and more than my share of bruises. The mountain took every opportunity to test my physical strength and psychological vulnerabilities.

Every night, defeated, I sat under the stars wondering why I took on this journey. Every morning the crisp air of the sunrise reminded me why.

Life gets complicated after deployment. Every day for almost a year, I left a piece of myself in the mountains of Afghanistan.  In that void, the sight, smell, and sounds of war followed me home. I thought that I was climbing the North Cascades make a film. But that's not why the mountain called my name.

The mountain wanted to return something to me that was left behind on a battlefield on the other side of the world...

My peace. My purpose. My sanity.

Words cannot express how thankful I am to the Sierra Club Outdoors and Adventure Film School for giving me the opportunity to heal the wounds of war through fun, friendship, and filmmaking.There is no better place to clear you mind than being in the great outdoors.

If you can't see the forest through the trees, then get above the tree line.

Elle Hansen, OIF, OEF Veteran

The veteran film school was an extraordinary experience - top to bottom for me.  I learned a helluva lot about both filmmaking and climbing - not to mention PACKING! 

- Ben Patton

I figured the adventure film course in the northern Cascades would be great because, really, how could it not be? A week of alpine climbing with other vets while learning how to make movies. But I wasn't expecting the days to be as amazing as they were, or that I'd learn as much as I did, about alpine climbing, film making, and the experiences and perspectives of others on the trip.

- Brian Mockenhaupt, OIF Veteran, Journalist